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Nic

Found 1 result

  1. Pic0o

    Original 8-bit NES

    Backstory here is that I came into ownership of my original NES console from my younger cousins. At first boot I could not load any carts and took to researching the 'flashing red power light'. Turns out the 72 pin adapter goes bad over time and they tend to need replacement to avoid the flashing red light syndrome. I picked up a replacement adapter from a local retro video game store, maybe 2 years ago now. To paint a scenario I forgot about the extent of fiddling with carts you have to do, even with the replacement 72-pin installed. Let me pause here to say this is an original NES with the tray system, not the revised top-loader NES. I can get most games booted but it does take a few minutes sometimes to do so. I am actually looking to resolve this by modding my tray and 72-pin with a Blinking Light Win. This device looks to be a fixed position tray with a holder in place for the back of the 72 pin adapter. For you PC build nerds, it looks like ISA card connections on the carts and the inside of the NES. Here is a replacement guide if you go to replace the 72 pin adapter on an original NES with the OEM-like part. I will update once I install the Blinking Light Win mod, as I have about a dozen carts and some are especially picky to load. Jumping back to current tense, my next rival was playing on an HDTV. Luckily I have the original power supply and those coax boxes to get video output and audio. Once you make sure the TV is set to cable and the switch on the back of the console is set to either channel 03 or 04, change to the same channel on your TV and you should have video when booting up a game. However you will likely see quite a bit of line noise on your screen and the colors will look funky or blurred. Here you have the option of running RCA cables instead of the Coax box from your NES. Yellow is your video and Red is the mono audio. In the case of a Samsung TV, my component video input also works for standard Yellow, Red, White RCA connects, if you plug the Yellow video signal into the Green component input. Doing this will remove the rolling noise from your NES and make playing a much cleaner video experience. Speaking of HDTVs, if you want to play Lightgun games (Duck Hunt), you are out of luck there. I have seen some cool modifications with external hardware to reproduce the white detection block that the gun looks for to register a hit, but the TL;DR is that HDTVs draw the screen at once, instead of sequentially by pixel for that frame to be detected by the zapper guns, versus CRTs. That linked Hack A Day article is fresh with the solution and hardware used. As for me, I have a small display that might meet the crt requirement. I have to repair it and try that out. Over the last week or so, I hooked the NES back up to come to these observations and jot them down. Thanks to a friend who ordered an AVS from RetroUSB, I learned about this console that will output directly over HDMI. Upon checking this out I also put an order in for one. In the mean time, I'm kicking it on original hardware and looking to remedy the great cart loading struggle. I also learned how bad I am at original Mario 1. It comes back to you after a couple hours, but wow games were brutal hard in the 80s and 90s with limited lives, no continue, jump timings and the like. If you want to go through time reading up on older consoles, have fun on the RetroRGB site. It's like a library for consoles, how they work and what the modding scene is up to. It's safe to say, once I have an AVS in my hands, I will share my experience with it. I did read the 1st generation of the AVS had a loose power connection, that should be since fixed in the later iterations. Do note the ordering link is for reservations on the next batch with no solid ship date established.
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